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Hospice UK 2017 Annual Conference: Using, Generating and Using Research

Author: Dr Sarah Russell
08 November 2017

Dr Sarah Russell, Hospice UK’s Head of Research and Clinical Innovation, explains the sessions on research taking place at Hospice UK’s upcoming national conference.

Research is not a luxury, it is a standard for care. It is about being constantly curious and disciplined to discover and implement evidence that informs us about the best models of care, gaps in knowledge and practice, and different ways of working.

Fundamental to this is how we ‘Use-Generate-Use’ research, in other words  use the current research literature effectively and competently, generate new evidence effectively and competently, and use and share new research effectively and competently.

The Hospice UK annual conference this year has many sessions of interest to the constantly curious, demonstrating how we use and generate research.

As well as the very many other sessions and peer reviewed displayed posters do also join us on:

Wednesday 22 November, 12.30 – 13.15 Research ‘get together’

Professor Sam Ahmedzai, Karen Charnley, Dr Lorna Fraser, Dr Stephen Mason

In this informal and interactive session we will ask, discuss and debate some of the current issues and solutions in hospice and palliative care research. Central to this session is to meet and network with others interested in and/or carrying out research within the hospice and palliative care community.

15.30 – 16.45 Using outcomes to make a difference

Professor Fliss Murtagh, Dr Peter May

This session will focus on person-level measurement of outcomes and resources, and reflect on how to interpret aggregated point-of-care outcomes data, what is useful for service development and quality improvement, and how to understand and interpret evidence on costs and resource use in a meaningful way.

Thursday 23 November, 12.50 – 13.35 Writing for Publication

Adrian Aldcroft, Editor, BMJ Open

This informative session will advise and discuss on writing for publication. It will illustrate how important it is to think how we can share the research we generate.

14.40 – 16.00 It is the journey not just the destination: reflections on Advance Care Planning

Dr Erica Borgstrom, Dr Bridget M Johnston, ‎ Dr Gill Horne, Dr Sarah Russell

This interactive session will demonstrate how we can move knowledge into practice by presenting findings from four doctoral theses relating to the multiple considerations for advance care planning.

Friday 24 November, 09.00 – 09.45 Rhetoric, research and reality: access to palliative care in the UK 

Professor Mike Bennett, Matthew Allsop

What do we know about access to palliative care in the UK? This session will demonstrate the vital link between research and practice.

10.00 – 11.15 What role can hospices play in reducing the number of people dying inappropriately in hospital?  Introducing the HOLISTIC project 

Jacquie White,  Dr Yvonne Anderson, Dr Steven Walker, Claire Hawksworth,  Mark Jarman-Howe,  Andy Shaw

Understanding what hospice models of care can influence  in other settings, benefitting care in both the present and future.

13.10 - 13.50  Oral poster showcase

Join the oral poster presenters as they tell us why they should win the oral poster showcase.

  • Developing an interdisciplinary postgraduate programme in palliative and end of life care
  • A service evaluation of the Islington Bereavement Service
  • Every day counts - pilot of a service for improving access and consistency in palliative care seven days a week
  • Providing hospice care at home for people who do not live in a traditional home or who are homeless

Research should interact with others, influencing care both in the present and future. This is often done through visible and accessible outputs such as reports, policy, procedures, education, papers, conference presentations and posters. Thank you to everyone who this year has provided ideas, inspiration and examples of how they are using past evidence, generating and using new evidence in care, practice, policy and education.

For full details of the programme visit Hospice UK National Conference 2017

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