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Catching Up with Joan Tiflian

Author: Shaun Thomas
25 April 2017

This week we continue to highlight Ladies of Hope. Ladies of Hope is a Non-Governmental Organisation centre for social development, transformation and capacity building for impoverished community within the society system and class of South Africa.

We had the privilege of having a chat with Joan Tiflian who is a registered nurse and has been an active member of the organisation for the past 6 years. Joan has a rich experience in nursing having trained as a registered nurse in Cape Town working with infectious diseases, and thereafter ventured to England (London) for 10 and a half years where she touched on cancer nursing (oncology).

In England is where she came across her first experience of the Palliative care wards where she worked in them for 6 months, she then continued to work in England for 25 and half years and in the last 7 years of working in England she worked in the pain and palliative care wards. 

After that she then decided she wants to venture back to her home town where she grew up to do care in the community. “Once I arrived back I heard about Ladies of hope and that they were in need of a registered nurse. I then decided to join them and practise Palliative care with them” she added.

Joan stressed that there a real need for nurses in the communities and her call for this is a mutual one. Currently the nurses cannot cope, and it’s a hectic stress on them. However on the bright side of things the impact that is being made in the community is amazing. “We are the shining hope in a very dark community at times” she said.

One of Joan’s major concerns is that hospitals send patients home without any support or resources, and that’s when we try and our very best to assist to provide Palliative care and home based care.

Impact in the community

·        150 patients who they are able to reach and provide care for

·        Great need for Palliative care services, and the impact is ever lasting. Past patients are forever grateful, thanking them for having their loved one in the care of the hospice.

·        No other HBC (Home-based carers)/givers nearby, community really do appreciate the work that they do.  

To find out more about the team and projects at Ladies of hope, click here.

 

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