Cookies on the ehospice website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. We also use cookies to ensure we show you advertising that is relevant to you. If you continue without changing your settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on the ehospice website. However, if you would like to, you can change your cookie settings at any time.

World experts gather in Dublin to develop global future of palliative care

Author: Mary Ellen Breen
15 October 2015

Conference seeks greater integration of palliative care into worldwide health systems.

Experts in palliative care from across the Globe are gathering in Dublin Castle again today to develop improved care for people with serious and non-curable illness.

The purpose of the international meeting is to develop global implementation of a recent World Health Assembly Resolution which calls on countries, including Ireland, to strengthen the integration of palliative care services into national health services.

The two day Global Colloquium is being co-hosted by the All Ireland Institute of Hospice and Palliative Care (AIIHPC) and the World Health Organisation (WHO) and includes top level experts from health services across world.

Themes that are being explored include a public health approach to palliative care, models of palliative care provision, palliative care and chronic illness throughout the lifespan and the integration of palliative care into various care settings and the challenges for palliative care leadership, research, education and practice.

Minister for Health Leo Varadkar welcomed the international delegates to Dublin and stated the Irish Government’s commitment to palliative care.

“The fact that so many more people are living for so much longer is one of the great success stories of our age. But it also means that increased numbers of people in the community have chronic diseases or a life-limiting illness.

“This Government recognises that societies need to plan now in order to meet the future demand for palliative care. We will have to provide more and better palliative services in more settings to more people.

“Here in Ireland, we want to ensure that everyone has access to the type of palliative care that they need, regardless of their diagnosis, how old they are, or whether they are cared for in a hospice, an acute hospital, a nursing home or at home.”

Dr. Ed Kelley of the World Health Organisation said that the Colloquium would encourage implementation of the World Health Assembly resolution on strengthening palliative care.

“Here in Dublin we have the opportunity to develop the language, aspirations and principles for the future of palliative care. At the heart of this is better outcomes and health for populations as a result of greater access to improving approaches to palliative care.” 

Information resource for Island of Ireland –

AIIHPC Director Paddie Blaney took the opportunity to showcase work in Ireland and presented a comprehensive new information resource for patients, families and professionals in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

“AIIHPC is delighted to present The Palliative Hub which we hope will become the ‘go to’ information portal for palliative care in Ireland and also provide a model for public, professional and educational knowledge sharing which other countries can draw from.”

“At users are greeted with a gateway to four different websites dedicated to palliative care include Adult and Public, Children and Young People, Professional and Learning Platform. The resource is nearing completion and will be fully operational in the coming weeks.

Among the delegates in attendance at the Colloquium were members of Voices4Care, AIIHPC’s panel of palliative care users and carers who bring insights from a service users perspective which will be highly valuable for discussion about service design, development and implementation.

See more articles in Education

Comments | 0 comments

There are currently no comments. To be the first to make a comment...

Add comment

Denotes required field

Your Name



Most viewed articles